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are devouring it right from the machine. technology has eliminated patients. we need the story before the story is actually even done. i get the feeling that because of technology, we have been addicted to the adrenaline of novel at this where we need to get everything right away. what's that -- what that is causing is a pile up in the fog. all of the reporters with the information and all of it contradictory and they are scrambling like they are working in a kitchen at denny's. i haven't seen this much backtracking since a lost hitchhikers, it's nut. >> police are probably not able to get their hands on. when you think of it, a lot of the shrapnel is sadly lodged in the victims at the hospital. a the will of these victims have r. intubated. a lot of the doctors don't want to remove the shrapnel from the body which can be considered nevada some situations. i think the feds are probably dealing with a lot of obstacles as well. >> you know, i feel for everybody involved in investigating. this the pressure is so big for them to come up with an eanget today we didn't mention this yet. we do stories
you identify -- do you look through mug shots? how do you find that person? >> the technology has improved tremendously in terms of facial recognition technology and they are using that matching images on video at the scene to any faces that might be in databases and running that to see if there's any sort of match. another way is, okay, here's an image that we've got. let's go back to others who we know that were at the scene and who were at businesses nearby and show a picture. that would be routine police work that is done. that's many, many aspects and i'm sure there are others that they are not going to talk to us about as they attempt to track down who planted these devices. >> help me here because all the time we're talking about union station or 30th street station in philly or anywhere, there's a big stein and an announcement. why don't they let the people see the person and say, i know this i goo, i know this woman? i assume it's a guy. >> that's part of the debate that's been going on all day today as you look at the mess that went on this afternoon with some of the bad
of technology of reengaging the public to see something and say something. better intelligence or take a better look at what local law enforcement is seeing. this was my worst nightmare. who didn't have a prior criminal record. someone that got radicalized without a footprint and dame out of nowhere. components for the bomb can be bought at a local store. >> heather: is this something we should see from now on and how do we protect ourselves without becoming a police state? >> the 9/11 cut off the head of al-qaeda. the ability to do the same type of attack is really over. this is what they have to go to now. the challenge is how do you know when someone is radicalized? the key is in talking with commissioner kelly and his team, they switch up everything. it's not about static security. you don't have people that do the same type of patrols. you mix it up. >> heather: flexibility? >> also you use different type of technology. facial recognition is not where it ought to be. cameras are after the event but we need that kind of technology pro-active. the other key is not sit back and say we have to
and the military side. i've constantly tried to improve how we address the need for the next generation technology, public-private cooperation and ensuring that we have the price personnel to counter this 21st century cyberthreat. however, i am uncompromising in safeguarding the rights of our citizens and i will never sacrifice our civil liberties for unneeded intrusion. to this end, the amendment i am offering today would strengthen existing provisions in the bill to include the privacy officer and the officer for civil rights and civil liberties of the department of homeland security askey stakeholders in the report that would a-- as key stakeholders in the report. this report would assess how this legislation affected our civil liberties and privacy throughout our federal government, and the department of homeland security is the -- the key civil department in our federal government that develops and implements cybersecurity protocalls for the rest of the -- protocols for the rest of the federal government. it is crucial that they be part of any assessment and work with both the privacy office
of their own people and continue to develop technology it is a matter of time before they have technology to reach us. do you agree with that? >> probably so. if they keep working at it and they have a single-minded focus focus, particularly the current leader may be more intensely than his father i think feels that is the key to their survival. >> i think that is a good honest assessment put them in the bucket of threats that the nation faces a capable of north korea with larger missiles and probably smaller bombs producing that is a reasonable threat we should plan against if nothing changes? >> i do blie that. >> syria. to give enough chemical weapons to kill thousands? >> potentially yes and that is very dependent on lots of things are the number of casualties that could be incurred in favor employee. >> but they have a lot that could killltofpele >> correct. that's another step. over the last six months as we are imposing sanctions and negotiating through the regime do they have more or less enriched uranium? >> we will get you the exact numbers enclosed context. >> can i say it is m
of this implementation was really to create information and technology exchanges in every part of the country. and they are focusing most specifically on critical access, hospitals and on small providers. knowing that the l to have a big i.t. department or have people who could implement this in a sfiio of time were not there. so in every state there are individuals who are sort of, i compared them to the farm extension services, folks were on the ground literally, office to office, hospital to hospital, spend time on how to convert what the best strategies are, how did engaged and involved. and we found at least in a state like kansas, which is not terribly different from the challenges i think that you see in your state, that that strategy has been enormously effective. and small providers are engaged and enrolled with those extensions operations, and find them to be kind of their service team on the ground. >> the only thing i would say, i hope that as we move forward with this, that the focus really will be on issue of interoperability we've asked questions numerous time of the committee
they needed to replace older security equipment and technology, expand restricted we keyway system ems and place security levers on all doors which allowed teachers to lock tours doors from the inside. you may say that's not expensive. why do you need to spend money? it sure adds up when you really want to secure a door and you want to do it right. so if you have many, many doors so we can help them do these things. and if they wanted to, make sure they harden their facility, that's what the money is for. now, there's a township in new jersey, they used funds to secure perimeter and playground areas by installing security gates at elementary and intermediate schools to create a safer learning environment. the new exterior fences define school boundaries making the schools safer for students. entourier gates were replaced, providing the ability to lock off specific areas of the schools during emergencies. again, it's common sense but when these schools were built, madam president, no one thought about this. everything was open. like the capitol, when i came here, i'm dating myself, a lo
shows in terms of sales volume, and we all know how we're using our technology more and more every day for our personal lives and how we defend on it. for example, the national shooting sports foundation surveyed owners of modern sporting rifles in 2010 and found that 10% of them, 10% of all rifles sold had purchased their firearms at gun shows, whereas 25% had purchased them online. 25%. believe me, i understand the political stakes for my colleagues and i sympathize. i have been there. i understand it. and comes from states like west virginia, and no state has a higher regard for the second amendment rights to bear arms than my state. in fact, on the great seal of the state of west virginia, the preamble is montani sember liberai. in latin, that means mountaineers are always free. you know how we feel. one of the review states that became a state during the civil war, broke away from virginia at that time. but west virginians are also guided by a little common sense. i have said this. in west virginia, we know what nonsense is, we know what common sense is, and now we know what gun s
and technology these is expanding those. i tried to pass it by unanimous consent. than schumer came up and said no, but i will pass, how about passing mind by unanimous consent? i was quite. i would've let this go by unanimous consent. they would have been shocked. i think it would've been great fun to see that all of the week as part of immigration reform just by unanimous consent. >> jerry? >> i have a couple of them. i had ask you why you think so highly of our late mayor, grover cleveland? >> f. i was allowed to go back when i wasn't alive, he seemed to be opposed to special interests. he also seemed to veto a bunch of bills, and i think that, you know, it was a time period, and i think some would call him a populist and i think that part of me feels that way. >> alex and then bolton. >> it was reported you were raising money for the national association for gun rights and it was just reported that last week this came up for conversation in the steering committee luncheon. susan collins was pretty upset about that because national association of gun rights is running ads in her state. she i
of research that is necessary to develop new means and possibly new technology, new tools that are institutions of higher learning but institutions of learning across the board, beginning with our elementary schools need to do better. and i am proud to be a cosponsor of this legislation. i look forward to working with my colleagues to assuring that it will be passed. and senator kaine, who spoke so evocatively and eloquently on this floor today and who showed such grace under pressure, which is one of the definitions of courage, in responding to the virginia tech tragedy, he has worked to deal with the wounds, and he has resolved to learn from virginia tech. and indeed he worked as a governor to seek safer campuses across virginia and across the country. he fought to put in place commonsense laws that were -- would prevent shooters like cho seung-hui from having access to the arsenal that he used six years ago. and i want to thank senator kaine for helping to lead the effort for a ban on high-capacity ammunition magazines like the ones used at virginia tech and used at new
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10